San Blas – (Seafood, snorkling and cracking coconuts)

Posted by on Jul 20, 2012 in Travel Blog | 0 comments

San Blas – (Seafood, snorkling and cracking coconuts)

On the day of departure we arrived at immigration and had our passports stamped and boarded the boat. We cruised out of harbor with Cartagena in the distance. It was sad to leave South America but I knew it wouldn’t be the last time I visited. The first 36 hours of the trip was through open water. I took sea sick tablets as a precaution. I had been violently sick on a previous trip from Bali to Darwin 3 years prior and knew it was not worth the risk. I could only relate to the others on board who had opted to take the tablets if they felt sick. It’s too late for that as they could not stomach anything. We island hoped for the next few days, stopping off for a dips in crystal clear water. We swam between uninhabited islands, drunk from fresh coconuts, snorkeled and played beach volleyball. The local fisherman would pull up alongside our boat and sell their mornings catch to us. So as you can imagine we ate alot of fresh seafood, drank alot of beer and local rum. It was on the 3rd day that the majority of the boat had ran out of beer. Luckily the captain knew of an island that supplied beer to passing yachts. At $1.5 dollars a can it was reasonably priced considering our remoteness to the mainland. Troy and I took orders and the money from practically 75% of all on board. With my broken Spanish I was able to borrow the local’s boat. It was a traditional wood carved canoe from the Kuna people. I needed this to transport our supplies and left our 2 person plastic kayak for our return. I could see everyone on the boat look on as Troy and I loaded up the canoe. What would happen next not only make everyone on board our boat laugh but had the local tribe on the island in stitches. Instantly the boat felt uneven.   The smallest of movements made us both think that we were going to capsize the canoe.  We rocked and rolled in the open water. The physics didn’t make sense. We stroked on opposite sides with equal force but the canoe just turned to the right. We completed 2 circles, which I jokingly tried to claim as being a salute symbol to the Kuna people. We zig zagged our way towards the yacht. Eventually I realized that only one person should paddle. The entire boat thought it was hilarious but I doubted their laughter if $175 worth of beers were at the bottom of the ocean. I laughed it off as if all was under control. So far from the truth. It was a great way to travel between Central and South America and I highly recommend the sailing trip to anyone else considering this option. I made alot of friends that I will no doubt catch up with throughout my Central American travels.

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